Heraldry: Morton

Title-MortonEach family connects hundreds of people to form an intricate pattern of ancestors and descendants. Our origins span the world, our families come from all religions and ways of life. The common thread of Heraldry links many cultures and establishes the foundations of a Surname before words were a common understanding and images demonstrated a basic understanding to the populace.

This page represents the following Surnames: Morton.  Moore.  Martin.  Muir.

Heraldry for every family is represented on each page as it has become available through out our research, as a tribute to the historical and evolutionary process that each family has survived. Name definitions are provided for each family as we find a connection to them, through intermarriage or discovery. Scottish, English and Irish families are represented with tartans, badges and other memorabilia as it becomes available to us. We’ve worked very hard at finding the most accurate and appropriate connections for each surname, if you see an error or have more information to add, please contact us via e-mail at CSGS@SnowStones.com.


 

Morton Name Meaning

‘Person from Morton or Moreton’, the name of various places in England and Scotland (marshland farmstead).

Morton Name Meaning and History

English and Scottish: habitational name from any of the many places called Mor(e)ton, named in Old English as ‘settlement (tun) by or on a marsh or moor (mor)’.

Swedish: variant of Martin.

French: contracted form of Moreton 2.
Americanized form of one or more like-sounding Jewish surnames or of various other non-English names bearing some kind of similarity to it.

Martin Name Meaning and History

English, Scottish, Irish, French, Dutch, German, Czech, Slovak, Spanish (Martín), Italian (Venice), etc.: from a personal name (Latin Martinus, a derivative of Mars, genitive Martis, the Roman god of fertility and war, whose name may derive ultimately from a root mar ‘gleam’). This was borne by a famous 4th-century saint, Martin of Tours, and consequently became extremely popular throughout Europe in the Middle Ages. As a North American surname, this form has absorbed many cognates from other European forms.

English: habitational name from any of several places so called, principally in Hampshire, Lincolnshire, and Worcestershire, named in Old English as ‘settlement by a lake’ (from mere or mær ‘pool’, ‘lake’ + tun ‘settlement’) or as ‘settlement by a boundary’ (from (ge)mære ‘boundary’ + tun ‘settlement’). The place name has been charged from Marton under the influence of the personal name Martin.

Moreton Name Meaning and History

English: variant spelling of Morton.

French: nickname from a double diminutive of More.
Spanish (Moretón): from moretón ‘brown’, ‘tanned’ (of skin).

More Name Meaning and History

Scottish: variant spelling of Muir.

Welsh: from mawr ‘big’ (see Moore).

French: nickname for a dark-skinned person, from Old French more ‘Moor’ (Latin maurus).

French (also Moré): nickname from Old French of more ‘Moor’ or from moré, moret ‘dark brown’ (diminutive forms). The term was also used to refer to dark-colored cloth.

French (Moré): from a short pet form of a Germanic personal name beginning with Maur-, Mor- ‘Moor’, for example, Morbold (+ bold ‘bold’, ‘brave’) or Morbert (+ berht ‘bright’, ‘famous’).

Indian (Maharashtra); pronounced as two syllables: Hindu (Maratha) name, probably from Marathi mor ‘peacock’ (Sanskrit mayura). It is based on the name of a Maratha clan.

Muir Name Meaning and History

Scottish: topographic name for someone who lived on a moor, from a Scots form of Middle English more ‘moor’, ‘fen’.

Moore Name Meaning and History

English: from Middle English more ‘moor’, ‘marsh’, ‘fen’, ‘area of uncultivated land’ (Old English mor), hence a topographic name for someone who lived in such a place or a habitational name from any of the various places named with this word, as for example Moore in Cheshire or More in Shropshire.

English: from Old French more ‘Moor’ (Latin maurus). The Latin term denoted a native of northwestern Africa, but in medieval England the word came to be used informally as a nickname for any swarthy or dark-skinned person.

English: from a personal name (Latin Maurus ‘Moor’). This name was borne by various early Christian saints. The personal name was introduced to England by the Normans, but it was never as popular in England as it was on the Continent.

Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Mórdha ‘descendant of Mórdha’, a byname meaning ‘great’, ‘proud’, or ‘stately’.

Scottish: see Muir.

Welsh: from Welsh mawr ‘big’, applied as a nickname or distinguishing epithet.


Family Motto: ‘A Te Pro Te’ (From Three, For Three)

Family Crest:   Coat of Arms

Surname References from:
Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4
Encyclopedia of Surnames, John Ayto, A & C Black Publishers Ltd, ISBN 978 0 7136 8144 4
(Unless otherwise stated)

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