Heraldry: Gill

Title-GillEach family connects hundreds of people to form an intricate pattern of ancestors and descendants.  Our origins span the world, our families come from all religions and ways of life.  The common thread of Heraldry links many cultures and establishes the foundations of a Surname before words were a common understanding and images demonstrated a basic understanding to the populace.

This page represents the following Surnames: Gill.  McGill.

Heraldry for every family is represented on each page as it has become available through out our research, as a tribute to the historical and evolutionary process that each family has survived. Name definitions are provided for each family as we find a connection to them, through intermarriage or discovery. Scottish, English and Irish families are represented with tartans, badges and other memorabilia as it becomes available to us. We’ve worked very hard at finding the most accurate and appropriate connections for each surname, if you see an error or have more information to add, please contact us via e-mail at CSGS@SnowStones.com.


 

Gill Name Meaning

‘Person who lives by a ravine’. (Middle English gill ‘ravine’, from Old Norse gil). From Pet-form of the male personal name Giles, Julian and William. From Irish Gaelic Mac Giolla and Scottish Mac Gille ‘Son of Giolla or Gille, literally ‘servant’, and Mac An Ghoill ‘son of the stranger’. From the Dutch form of Giles.
Also associated with the names Gall, McGill, MacGill and variations of those spellings.

Gill Name Meaning and History

English: from a short form of the personal names Giles, Julian, or William. In theory the name would have a soft initial when derived from the first two of these, and a hard one when from William or from the other possibilities discussed in 2–4 below. However, there has been much confusion over the centuries.

Northern English: topographic name for someone who lived by a ravine or deep glen, Middle English gil(l), Old Norse gil ‘ravine’.

Scottish and Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac Gille (Scottish), Mac Giolla (Irish), patronymics from an occupational name for a servant or a short form of the various personal names formed by attaching this element to the name of a saint. See McGill. The Old Norse personal name Gilli is probably of this origin, and may lie behind some examples of the name in northern England.

Scottish and Irish: reduced Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac An Ghoill (see Gall 1).

Norwegian: habitational name from any of three farmsteads in western Norway named Gil, from Old Norse gil ‘ravine’.

Dutch: cognate of Giles.

Jewish (Israeli): ornamental name from Hebrew gil ‘joy’.

German: from a vernacular short form of the medieval personal name Aegidius (see Gilger).

Indian (Panjab): Sikh name, probably from Panjabi gil ‘moisture’, also meaning ‘prosperity’. There is a Jat tribe that bears this name; the Ramgarhia Sikhs also have a clan called Gill.

Giles Name Meaning and History

English and French: from a medieval personal name of which the original form was Latin Aegidius (from Greek aigidion ‘kid’, ‘young goat’). This was the name of a 7th-century Provençal hermit, whose cult popularized the name in a variety of more or less mutilated forms: Gidi and Gidy in southern France, Gil(l)i in the area of the Alpes-Maritimes, and Gil(l)e elsewhere. This last form was taken over to England by the Normans, but by the 12th century it was being confused with the Germanic names Gisel, a short form of Gilbert, and Gilo, which is from Gail (as in Gaillard).

Irish: adopted as an Anglicized equivalent of Gaelic Ó Glaisne, a County Louth name, based on glas ‘green’, ‘blue’, ‘gray’.

Gall Name Meaning and History

Scottish, Irish, and English: nickname, of Celtic origin, meaning ‘foreigner’ or ‘stranger’. In the Scottish Highlands the Gaelic term gall was applied to people from the English-speaking lowlands and to Scandinavians; in Ireland the same term was applied to settlers who arrived from Wales and England in the wake of the Anglo-Norman invasion of the 12th century. The surname is also found at an early date in Lincolnshire, where it apparently has a Breton origin, having been introduced by Breton followers of the Norman Conquerors.
French, German, Polish, Slovak, Czech, Danish, etc.: from a personal name (Gallus in Latin) which was widespread in Europe during the Middle Ages, due to the cult of a 7th-century Irish monk and missionary, St. Gall. He established a Christian settlement to the south of Lake Constance, which became the monastery later known as St. Gallen. His name was taken into Czech as Havel and into Polish as Gawel, the extra syllable being introduced by analogy with Latin Paulus, which yielded Czech Pavel and Polish Pawel.

Hungarian (Gáll): variant of Gál (see Gal).

Gal Name Meaning and History

Polish, Slovak (Gál), and Slovenian: from a personal name, Latin Gallus (see Gall), which was widespread in Europe in the Middle Ages. There are many pet forms and other derivatives of this personal name; the American surname could also be a shortening of any of them. See also Gall.

Hungarian (Gál): from the ecclesiastical name Gál, a short form of Gál(l)os, from Latin Gallus (see Gall).

French: from the personal name Gallus (see 1), the name of a 6th-century bishop of Clermont.

French: habitational name for someone from either of two places named Saint Gal, in Lozère and Puy-de-Dôme, or from Saint Jal in Corrèze.

French: nickname from southern French gal ‘rooster’ (Old French jal, Latin gallus). As a French name, it appears to have been brought to the U.S. by Swiss bearers.
Jewish (Israeli): ornamental name from Hebrew gal ‘wave’.

Gilger Name Meaning and History

German: patronymic from a medieval personal name, a derivative of Aegilius, a later form of Aegidius.

McGill Name Meaning and History

Scottish (Galloway) and Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Mac an Ghoill ‘son of the stranger’ (see Gall 1).
Irish: short form of Gaelic names beginning with Mac Giolla ‘son of the servant (or devotee) of’ (see for example McElroy).

Scottish: Anglicized form of Mac Ghille Mhaoil, otherwise Anglicized as McMillan.


 

Family Motto: Sine Fine (Without End)

Family Crest:   Coat of Arms

Clan Badge:   Badge

Gill and McGill Ancient Family Tartan:

Plaid

Gill and McGill Family Tartan

Surname References from:
Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4
Encyclopedia of Surnames, John Ayto, A & C Black Publishers Ltd, ISBN 978 0 7136 8144 4
(Unless otherwise stated)

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