Heraldry: Barr

Title-BarrEach family connects hundreds of people to form an intricate pattern of ancestors and descendants. Our origins span the world, our families come from all religions and ways of life. The common thread of Heraldry links many cultures and establishes the foundations of a Surname before words were a common understanding and images demonstrated a basic understanding to the populace.

This page represents the following Surnames: Agner.

Heraldry for every family is represented on each page as it has become available through out our research, as a tribute to the historical and evolutionary process that each family has survived. Name definitions are provided for each family as we find a connection to them, through intermarriage or discovery. Scottish, English and Irish families are represented with tartans, badges and other memorabilia as it becomes available to us. We’ve worked very hard at finding the most accurate and appropriate connections for each surname, if you see an error or have more information to add, please contact us via e-mail at CSGS@SnowStones.com.


 

Barr Name Meaning

‘Person who lives by a barrier’ Such as a s City gateway (From Middle English barre ‘bar, obstruction’). ‘A person from Barr’, the name of several places in Southwestern Scotland and also in England (‘Hill). Also Barre ‘person from Barre-en-Ouche or Barre-de-Semilly, northern France (‘barrier or gateway). ‘Person who makes metal bars’. From the Medieval nickname for a tall thin person (reminiscent of a bar)

From the Irish Gaelic Ó Barr, a different form of Ó Báire, origin of Barry.

Barr Name Meaning and History

Scottish and northern Irish: habitational name from any of various places in southwestern Scotland, in particular Ayrshire and Renfrewshire, named with Gaelic barr ‘height’, ‘hill’ or a British cognate of this.

English: topographic name for someone who lived by a gateway or barrier, from Middle English, Old French barre ‘bar’, ‘obstruction’.

English (of Norman origin): habitational name from any of various places in northern France called Barre. See Barre.

English: habitational name from any of various places in England called Barr, for example Great Barr in the West Midlands, named with the Celtic element barro ‘height’, ‘hill’.

English: from the vocabulary word barr ‘bar’, ‘pole’, either a metonymic occupational name for a maker of bars, or perhaps a nickname for a tall, thin man.
Irish: from Ó Bairr, Donegal form of Ó Báire (see Barry 2).

Barre Name Meaning and History

Habitational name from any of various places called Barre. Barre-en-Ouche in Eure or Barre-de-Semilly in Manche are named with Old French barre ‘bar’, ‘obstruction’, ‘gateway’. Others, for example Barre in Lozère, derive their name from the Celtic element barr ‘height’.

(Barré) from barré, the past participle of Old French barrer, a derivative of barre ‘bar’ (see 1). The meaning of the surname derived from this word is uncertain. It may sometimes have been a topographic name for a person who lived in a place that was naturally cut off or particularly well fortified, but in many cases it was probably a nickname meaning ‘striped’, referring to a habitual wearer of striped clothing or possibly to someone with a noticeable birthmark. In the Middle Ages the term was also applied to the Carmelite Friars, who wore habits striped in black, yellow, and white, and it may have been used as a nickname for someone thought to resemble a Carmelite in some way. The name is also found in Germany, attested as a Huguenot name, for example in Magdeburg in 1703.

Barry Name Meaning and History

Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Beargha ‘descendant of Beargh’, a byname meaning ‘plunderer’.

Irish: Anglicized form of Gaelic Ó Báire ‘descendant of Báire’, a short form of either of two Gaelic personal names, Bairrfhionn or Fionnbharr.

English, of Welsh origin: patronymic from Harry, the medieval English vernacular form of Henry, preceded by Welsh ap ‘son of’. Compare Parry.
Variant spelling of Barrie.

Barrie Name Meaning and History

Scottish: habitational name from any of various places, especially one in Angus, generally named with Gaelic barr ‘height’, ‘hill’, or from a British cognate of this word.


 

Family Motto: ‘Fortitudine’ (With Fortitude)

Family Crest:   Coat of Arms  Coat of Arms

Surname References from:
Dictionary of American Family Names, Oxford University Press, ISBN 0-19-508137-4
Encyclopedia of Surnames, John Ayto, A & C Black Publishers Ltd, ISBN 978 0 7136 8144 4
(Unless otherwise stated)

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